Task Management

As a consultant with several clients, it is of utmost importance that each of my clients feels that he or she is getting the top treatment from me. I rely heavily on recommendations from my clients to fuel my business, and this in turn requires that I treat my clients well. Part of this is maintaining a rapid response time for all clients, so that they feel that I listen to them, and respond appropriately.

The problem on my end of this is simple. With several active clients, each of whom requires that I perform some task or another, how do I maintain a good relationship with all of them? Obviously, some tasks are more critical than others, but a client who has many low-priority tasks still requires a response, even if other clients keep raising high-priority items to be dealt with.

The system I use is fairly simple to implement, though the times I mention are meant as a general guideline, and can be changed according to need. Each client I work for, when they submit a task, is given an immediate response time. So if Client A submits a low priority task, I may inform him that the task will be completed within 3 weeks. This is based on the amount of work I currently have, plus some space for new high-priority tasks that might come in before the three weeks. However, if nothing else comes into play during that time, I may complete the task earlier. From the client’s perspective, since I have provided a time frame for the task, they are tolerant of a delay in getting their task completed, as long as I abide by the time line I provided.

On my end, I simply keep a list of all active tasks. I have some projects which are ongoing, and last for potentially months at a time. For those, I try not to provide an absolute date for the final product, but instead, give a range which is refined as we approach the end of the project. In order to be able to work on those projects, I designate about 50% of my available time to all my new projects (more if the schedule is light that week). The other 50% is divided among short-term tasks, fixing bugs, making small changes, and maintainance. As a new task is sent to me, I add it to my list of active tasks, either under the short-term work or under the long-term work. Within that group, it is prioritized and assigned a completion date (or range, in the case of long-term work). Any future tasks that are sent in are then prioritized without moving any tasks that are already planned.

I don’t use any special tools or software to keep track of my work. I find that a pen and paper work just fine, as long as you keep that information highly visible. What I actually use is Excel, listing each task, who reported it, the time to complete it, and the completion date I provided the client. I also mark the last date that I worked on that project, and what version of the project that particular item is meant to be included with. That allows me to group pieces of work together and bundle them into single releases.

If you have another system for prioritizing across multiple clients, I would love to hear about it. My process is a work in progress, so I am very interested in hearing other methods of managing your workload.